Answers #1-9: Midland Election 2018

- democracy representation open government transparency due diligence

Answers #1-9

The Question

Are you prepared to allow adjournments of new business when it is clear that more information is needed? And what would constitute such clarity? If necessary are you prepared to revisit the rules regarding handling of council meetings to accommodate such needs?

Carole McGinn (Nicols) – Wednesday, September 19th 2018

Yes. It is not appropriate to make a decision on anything in life and especially when it affects others if you don’t have all the info. It depends on the matter in regards to defining what new info means. It is not a good usage of time to delay unless the matter is missing, convoluted or has incomplete information. Much comes before council after going through other processes. It is OK to wait for public input. Sometimes a decision needs to be made quickly and made to the best of everyones’ ability. Hopefully common sense and practicality will prevail. Councillors get their package before the meeting and can perform their due diligence in seeking input. Plus if they (we I hope) stay engage not much is a “full on” surprise. There are rare circumstances where in camera is proper. No decision is allowed to be made as in voted on while in camera. The reason for going in camera needs to be obvious and made known.

Jonathan Reid – Friday, September 21st 2018

Yes I am, depends on the situation and yes I am prepared to revisit rules if necessary

Bill Gordon – Saturday, September 22nd 2018

No need a for a wordy answer here. Democracy is denied when uninformed and rushed decisions are made. The procedural policy changes that were hastily passed by this outgoing council should be one the first topics of discussion by the new council.

Answered on Bill Gordon’s Website: Q & A Time With Voters – Volume 2.

Cher Cunningham – Monday, September 24 2018

I believe that this has already been covered in recent revisions to the Council format and schedule. The twice monthly joint Committee/Council meetings make it even easier to adjourn business to a future meeting and source or request more information. This question is subjective as situations would vary from matter to matter. However, unusual new business (beyond that for which we already have written policies), recommendations without data or reasoning, or those that would benefit from public input are a few items that would qualify to be adjourned with no qualms.

Stewart Strathearn – Monday, September 24 2018

Requested that due to time constraints that I point to his website: Elect Stewart Strathearn for Mayor — and noted that he asks constituents use a contact method listed on that site, or on the Town website, or otherwise public, to ask him the questions they have in person, if the website proves insufficient — after helping me with a council matter, and having a wide-ranging discussion.

Jonathan Main – Tuesday, September 25 2018

This is all handled under the procedural bylaw. Any member of council can introduce any new item of business at any time, but usually items are introduced a meeting before, and often items are referred to staff for a background report. Technically, at any point council (2/3rds majority) can override the agenda and introduce new items, we haven’t really seen this much but it’s allowed. Council is a parliament system so everything has to be done by motion, we need a motion to direct staff to do anything. Often some items are purely for information/discussion.

Elliot Sheaves – Tuesday, September 25 2018

Prefers to answer questions in person due to the ways in which written answers can be taken the wrong way. He met with me in person and we had a very long and informative discussion. He also said he welcomes one-on-one with any constituent who would like to know what he thinks on any issue. He has also launched Vote Elliot Sheaves.

Candidates who have not (yet) responded

Notes on the Answers

Answers in ‘normal text’ are the candidate’s written response and are taken verbatim. I use italics for my words such as summaries of verbal responses and/or pointing to websites at the request of the candidate.